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Course Description

The Academic Integrity Series: Urgent and Emerging Topics creates a space for timely and provocative discussion around issues related to academic integrity in post-secondary education. Experts from UCalgary and across the country offer insights on trending topics, like counterfeit credentials, contract cheating and equity, that will affect educators, policy makers and higher education professionals for years to come. 

Each webinar can accommodate 300 live participants. All registrants will be e-mailed a link to the recorded version of the webinar for viewing after the live event.

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Type
Online
Days
F
Time
10:00AM to 11:30AM
Dates
Dec 10, 2021
Schedule and Location
Hours
1.5
Delivery Options
Course Fees
No Cost non-credit $0.00
Section Notes

Managing Academic Integrity: Perspectives from Engineering

Academic misconduct is as old as the hills.  While it is discouraging to see this behavior, we really should not be too surprised when we discover cases in our classrooms.  A lot of research has explored why students cheat, and what instructors can do to reduce instances of misconduct.  There has been little discussion, however, on how schools manage academic integrity within their programs and institutions.  This webinar will cover academic integrity and misconduct from the lens of an administrator.  Institutions have policies and procedures in place to investigate allegations of misconduct, and they also have initiatives to promote integrity among students.  Results from a recent survey of engineering schools and engineering regulators will be reviewed, highlighting best practices and areas for improvement.

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Learn about common academic integrity and misconduct management practices.
  • Explore opportunities for improvement as instructors and leaders within our programs to better manage and promote academic integrity.

Speaker:

Dr. David deMontigny

David deMontigny is the Associate Dean Academic in the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Regina.  In this role, he is responsible for investigating allegations of misconduct and leading faculty initiatives to promote integrity among students.  David enjoys teaching and mentoring students to achieve their goals.

Type
Online
Days
F
Time
10:00AM to 11:30AM
Dates
Feb 18, 2022
Schedule and Location
Hours
1.5
Delivery Options
Course Fees
No Cost non-credit $0.00
Section Notes

Academic Integrity Challenges & Questions for Instructors and Students

Part of a well-rounded education is the requirement for students to communicate their knowledge in writing. But what happens when students lack the foundational skills (or willingness) to write to our standards? There are several options for them, ranging from the desirable/acceptable to the outright unethical. One choice is to use 'rephrasing software' which automatically replaces words with synonyms – whether they make sense in context or not. Sometimes, students do this 'manually' using translation apps or thesauruses. Regardless, the result is a poorly-written paper that can be borderline plagiarized.

In this session, I will briefly chronicle my response to one such situation, discuss how we can respond educationally, and pose some looming questions.

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify various tools that can be used to rephrase text
  • Determine appropriate and inappropriate uses of rephrasing technology
  • Consider responses to students who have used rephrasing technology or techniques

Speaker:

Dr. Claudius Soodeen

Dr. Claudius Soodeen, EdD, has been in the post-secondary education sector for many years and is currently the Faculty Development Consultant at Red River College Polytech, and a contract instructor at the University of Winnipeg. His interest in Academic Integrity (AI) stems from his observations of the frustrations students face due to language barriers and skill gaps, and to the occasional lapses in instruction. He holds the view that students, faculty and the institution are both responsible and vulnerable parties in the AI cycle of education, prevention, detection and resolution. His interests include designing and teaching for integrity, empathetic resolution, and ethical investigations of AI breaches.

Type
Online
Days
F
Time
10:00AM to 11:30AM
Dates
Mar 25, 2022
Schedule and Location
Hours
1.5
Delivery Options
Course Fees
No Cost non-credit $0.00
Section Notes

Visual plagiarism, what is it and what can we do about it?

Plagiarism as a topic is well researched and is widely understood in the academic community. However, this research and understanding largely focuses on plagiarism in the written word. Considerably less is known about visual plagiarism. While some scholarly literature on visual plagiarism exists, there is a dearth of literature on instructional, or best-practice resources for instructors. In this talk I will discuss ways to pre-emptively address visual plagiarism through education of instructors and students. I will speak to prevention with examples in four distinct disciplines, namely presentation design, illustration, digital media and architecture.

Keywords: Visual plagiarism, presentation design, illustration, digital media, architecture, Canada

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Define and describe visual plagiarism
  • Develop instructional practices that will help to prevent visual plagiarism in their discipline

Speaker:

Dr. John Paul Foxe

John Paul Foxe is the Director of Ryerson University’s Academic Integrity Office. Prior to this, he was the Manager of Ryerson’s Learning & Teaching Office, where he managed the development and delivery of professional development in teaching programs. John Paul completed his undergraduate degree in genetics at Trinity College Dublin and holds an MSc in Molecular Evolution and a PhD in population genetics, both from York University. Most recently, he completed an MA in Public Policy at Ryerson. John Paul’s interests include contract cheating prevention and awareness as well as the gamification of academic integrity education.

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